From the Desk Of…

GetAttachment.aspx “From the Desk Of…” is my new initiative this year to challenge the dominant narratives about international peace and security by sharing notable quotes, anecdotes, prose and poems about women, peace and security. These are tidbits that float across my desk from time to time. Do you have something you would like to share from your desk? Drop me a line!

What do the women say about making peace?  Here are a few lines from Sanam Anderlini’s excellent book, Women Building Peace.

“What kind of peace do we have if the men who raped and killed women now sit in the government?”–Claudine Tayaye Bib, Congolese peace activist

“You need us because we women are willing to sit together on the same side of the table and together look at our complex joint history, with the commitment and intention of not getting up until—in respect and reciprocity—we can get up together and begin our new history and fulfill our joint destiny.”–Terry Greenblatt, an Israeli, speaking before the UN Security Council, May 2002

“Peace is made between peoples and not between leaders. A process that should lead to a political solution that is sustainable and consequently permanent…should not be left to the confines of the gener als, and should be transparent to the relevant societies.” –Maha Abu Dayyeh Shammas, a Palestinian speaking before the UN Security Council, May 2002

From the Desk Of…

GetAttachment.aspx “From the Desk Of…” is my new initiative this year to challenge the dominant narratives about international peace and security by sharing notable quotes, anecdotes, prose and poems about women, peace and security. These are tidbits that float across my desk from time to time. Do you have something you would like to share from your desk? Drop me a line!

Here’s what men say–or at least what one man says–about making peace…

Excerpted from the We are Living Peace, We Are Powerful campaign. See more here.

We are supposed to be providers. We are supposed to be protectors. But when war makes it so we can longer be either, who are we supposed to be? Building life beyond violent conflict may look different, but this means we have even greater responsibilities than before. We need to rebuild—and we have to think beyond ourselves.

 As men, we are not powerful because of what we have. We are powerful because of what we do, for our families and for our communities. We are powerful when we start living peace. Every day. Together.

From the Desk Of….

GetAttachment.aspx “From the Desk Of…” is my new initiative this year to challenge the dominant narratives about international peace and security by sharing notable quotes, anecdotes, prose and poems about women, peace and security.  Do you have something you would like to share from your desk? Drop me a line!

Quote for the week…

“Prisoners used to be afraid of even looking at victims…But with time they came and asked for forgiveness because we encouraged them. Those who were released help us in fetching water, renovate our houses and to do our gardens. In return we give them food.”

–Rwandan women, widowed during the 1994 genocide, Women Building Peace by Sanam Anderlini

From the Desk Of…

GetAttachment.aspx “From the Desk Of…” is my new initiative this year to challenge the dominant narratives about international peace and security by sharing notable quotes, anecdotes, prose and poems about women, peace and security. These are tidbits that float across my desk from time to time. Do you have something you would like to share from your desk? Drop me a line!

Thought for the week….

The structure of world peace cannot be the work of one man, or one party, or one Nation…It must be a peace which rests on the cooperative effort of the whole world.

32nd President of the United States, Franklin D. Roosevelt in The War Messages of Franklin D. Roosevelt.

From the Desk Of…

GetAttachment.aspxFrom the Desk Of…” challenges the dominant narratives about international peace and security by sharing notable quotes, anecdotes, prose and poems about women, peace and security. These are tidbits that float across my desk from time to time. Do you have something you would like to share from your desk? Drop me a line!

In 1955, Dag Hammarskjold flew to China to meet with President Zhou Enlai to secure the release of American prisoners of war captured during the Korean War. This is what he said, “It does not mean that I appeal to you of that I ask you for their release. It means that—inspired also by my faith in your wisdom and in your wish to promote peace—I have considered it my duty as forcefully as I can, and with deep conviction, to draw attention to the vital importance of their fate to the cause of peace…Their fate may well decide the direction in which we will all be moving in the near future—towards peace or away from peace….”

Fulfilling the Mission: Empowering the UN to Live Up to the World’s Expectations, D. Ikeda 2006 Peace Proposal

From the Desk Of….

GetAttachment.aspxFrom the Desk Of…” challenges the dominant narratives about international peace and security by sharing notable quotes, anecdotes, prose and poems about women, peace and security. These are tidbits that float across my desk from time to time. Do you have something you would like to share from your desk? Drop me a line!

What is peace?

It’s a question we don’t spend enough time thinking about. Here’s what the Dalai Lama says, “Peace can only last where human rights are respected, where the people are fed, and where individuals and nations are free.”

From the Desk Off…

GetAttachment.aspx“From the Desk Of…” challenges the dominant narratives about international peace and security by sharing notable quotes, anecdotes, prose and poems about women, peace and security. These are tidbits that float across my desk from time to time. Do you have something you would like to share from your desk? Drop me a line!

Apologies to singer and songwriter Holly Near for excerpting/cannibalizing her beautiful but long prose-poem here. Please see Prayers for A Thousand Years edited by Elizabeth Roberts and Elias Amidon for the unedited version.

 

I am waiting for instructions…

From the girl child in the sweat shop whose little fingers bring in ten cents an hour, to the poet who shakes the world round when she speaks, “Good morning,” to the woman beaten beyond recognition by the man who says he loves her, to the activist who wraps herself around a tree as the blades drown out the sound of her beating heart, to the teenager holding the doll she never had after it comes through her body and will be with her for the rest of her life—to all these I cry out my womanness.

From the lovers hiding to the lovers who kiss in the moonlight as bombs fall just yards from their dreams, reminding me to feel joy when athlete and disabled dare to kiss, when Jew and Arab dare to kiss, when Irish and English dare to kiss, when man and man dare to kiss, when woman and woman dare to kiss, when black and white dare to kiss, reminding us all that for as long as loving evokes fear in our hearts, we have yet another mile to walk…

I have torn open my soul, worked to a sweat, wept with humiliation, struggled with confusion, battled with apathy and disillusion, confronted my beliefs again and again until I thought I would drown in sorrow; and yet, here I am on the dawn of a new millennium, profoundly informed by all life and love. I am ready to take the next step. Yet this time, I am filled with calm and grace, I feel less fear than ever before, I have learned compassioned in spite of myself, I do talk to the trees and listen to the wind, and I am waiting for instructions.